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We had to laugh at ourselves a bit with this one….

As every branding consultant and graphic designer knows, it’s a rare client who doesn’t ask “Can you make my logo a little bigger?” Or my other favorite, “what can we do to make it pop a little more?”

We typically launch into a long discussion about why prospects couldn’t care less about your logo or your company name for that matter; they are interested only in increasing their pleasure or diminishing their pain, and our job is to write pithy, compelling messaging that catches prospects’ attention and tells them how we’ll help.

At which point they say “yeah, but can you make my logo a litter bigger?”

Sigh…

Which brings us to the self-humoring mentioned above. We recently saw our logo so obnoxiously large that it was damn near embarrassing (it did not completely cross the embarrassing threshold, of course, because we’re marketers and most of our innate modesty has been squeezed out of us like a Sunday morning orange in a juice commercial).

So why was it so big? A couple of reasons:

  • It was serving a branding purpose, not a business development or call-to-action purpose. In branding, it is safe to say that bigger actually is better. Ditto for frequency – the more frequently you can feature your brand, the better.
  • More importantly, it just kind of happened that way… We were one of the sponsors of the Party in the Pit, a benefit concert that benefited Historic Ellicott City businesses affected by the terrible flash flood of 2016. Each sponsorship level had an on-screen slide with the logos of each sponsor at that level. Our sponsorship was different, though, as we were an in-kind sponsor of marketing services, so we were the only business on that slide, and just as work expands to fill the time allotted to it, so does logo size expand to fill the allotted real estate on a sponsorship slide!

Here’s the takeaway for our clients who might be wondering if what’s good for the goose ain’t good for the gander. You definitely do NOT want to fill your advertising space with a huge logo – that space should be reserved for compelling messaging (written or visual) that will spur prospects to action. But you DO want to use your branding space to its maximum.

So if you’re sponsoring yet another 5k race to be one of 37 other inch-wide logos on the back of a shirt, don’t do it; it won’t be worth the investment. Instead, spring for the giant, stand-alone logo on the start/finish banner and get more bang for your buck.

But if you’re like us and most of our clients, you’re not sponsoring for the marketing benefit anyway. You’re sponsoring because you’re a business owner, and with very, very few exceptions, business owners are some of the best citizens I know. They support the community simply to make it a better place.

Thanks to all the sponsors who put up real honest-to-goodness cash to help raise over $160,000 for those flood-ravaged businesses trying to rise from the silt and mud of the Tiber River and Patapsco River.

We’re including links to all those sponsors here – please consider patronizing them.